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Books by William Ryan

The Search for Old Kings Road
I am Grey Eyes
Osceola His Capture
Bulow Gold
Door to Time
Lost Plantations










 


I am Grey Eyes a story of old Florida

Grey Eyes was an early Seminole cattleman.  He was noted in letters by British Governor James Grant in St. Augustine.  The Spanish had ruled St. Augustine for some 200 years and now they were gone.  The town was almost ruined with bad roads except for former ancient Indian trails.  The Grant letter tells of "my good friend, the Indian Grey Eyes," who drove an immense herd of some 500 cattle from Georgia down into the relatively unmapped Florida wetlands.  Grey Eyes was credited for blazing the trail for sections of the Old Kings Road, one of the first roads into Florida.

This is a story of early colonial Florida and viewed with the eyes of Grey Eyes, and exceptional and very unusual Indian.  His story incorporates real characters such as Black Sandy and others who really lived in these violent times and appeared in original Florida historic documents.

There is even a hint of a true story about the "Lost Colony" of Roanoke which may have a strong connection to our grey eyed Indian.  History author Bill Ryan has connected fiction with fact to yield a readable story of the times, written in his first person style.  I am Grey Eyes is intended to connect real events and characters in the early history of Florida into a readable story that goes far beyond the known cattle drive of Grey Eyes and his helpers.  Complete with maps and photographs, I am Grey Eyes is a fitting sequel to The Search for Old Kings Road and is the next book in the Old Kings Road series.

Bill Ryan comments:
"I was in Down By The Sea" boutique store at 208 S. 3rd Street, Flagler Beach with owner Betty Jo Strickland when in came a customer who was reading my book.  He said he was of Indian heritage and was related to the "Lost Colony" of Roanoke.  We then spoke of the Indian  Grey Eyes.  When you are writing what you think is 'historical fiction' based on your limited research sources, often a character will arise and say 'here I am, I lived, I was real, so now tell my story.'

I have attempted to give you a view of the early history of Florida from and Indian point of view with Grey Eyes.  He was real, he lived and has a tale to tell.  I hope you enjoy it."

 



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